Egypt TodayEgypt Today, 2017
“The RISE Collaborative at the Seattle Asian Art Museum”
Darren Byler, 2017
egypttoday.com/Article/4/8949/Lisa-Ross-‘Living-Shrines’-photo-exhibit-conveys-spirituality/

art of lifeThe Art of Life in Chinese Central Asia,
“The RISE Collaborative at the Seattle Asian Art Museum”
Darren Byler, 2017
livingotherwise.com/2016/08/17/the-rise-collaborative-at-the-seattle-asian-art-museum/

ArtForumARTFORUM Picks, “Lisa Ross: FOTOGRAFISKA”
Monica Westin, 2014
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London Review of BooksLondon Review of Books, “Behind the Dunes”
Nick Holdstock, 2014
lrb.co.uk/blog/2014/01/16/nick-holdstock/behind-the-dunes/

New York Review of BooksThe New York Review of Books, “China’s Sufis: The Shrines Behind the Dunes,” 2013
nybooks.com/blogs/nyrblog/2013/apr/25/china-xinjiang-sufi-shrines/

 

NYTimesThe New York Times
Holland Cotter, 2013
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NPRNPR, “The Spirit Of China's Sufi Shrines,” 2013
npr.org/blogs/pictureshow/2013/03/07/173755091/the-spirit-of-chinas-sufi-shrines#

The Wall Street JournalThe Wall Street Journal, “On Photography: Veneration of Saints, Shadows, the Surreal,” 2013
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Le JournalLe Journal de la Photographie, “Lisa Ross: Living Shrines of Uyghur China,” 2013
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Art NewsARTNews ARTTALK, “Desert Flowers,” 2013
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Los Angeles Review of BooksLos Angeles Review of Books, Nick Holdstock interviews Lisa Ross,
“Eternal Sleep: The Uyghur Shrines of the Taklamakan Desert,” 2013
lareviewofbooks.org/article.php?id=1669

YogaCity NYCYoga Weekly, “The Shrines Of Remote Uyghur, China Living Monuments For Healing,” 2013
yogacitynyc.com/articles/WeeklyDetails/701/

Uzbek JourneysUzbek Journeys, “Living Shrines of Uyghur China - Exhibition at Rubin Gallery, New York,” 2013
uzbekjourneys.com/2013/05/living-shrines-of-uyghur-china.html

Steppe MagazineSteppe Magazine, “Living Shrines of Uyghur China,” 2013
steppemagazine.com/2013/05/living-shrines-of-uyghur-china/#

SurfaceSurface, “The Endorsements, Survey of Rising Talents,” 2013
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The Rubin has on display 24 of Ms. Ross's archival pigment prints of mazars, as well as two 11-minute videos of people coming to venerate saints.

Ms. Ross is taken with the spiritual experience of the desert, a vast expanse of sand surrounded by mountains, as well as with the lonely simplicity of the mazars. Many of the mazars consist of sticks bound together and stuck into the ground; pilgrims attach bits of cloth to them to mark their visit.

Columbia SpectatorColumbia Spectator, “SoA alumna captures piece of China rarely seen,” 2013
columbiaspectator.com/arts-and-entertainment/2013/02/21/soa-alumna-captures-piece-china-rarely-seen

hyperallergenicThe Curious Desert.... by An Xiao on Hyperallergic, 2012
hyperallergic.com/47714/lisa-ross

SVADegree Critical, an online journal by SVA Program in Art Criticism and Writing.
“Lisa Ross at Asya Geisberg Gallery”
Aldrin Valdez, 2011
artcriticism.sva.edu/?post=lisa-ross-at-asya-geisberg

A Curator MagazineA Curator Magazine, “Lisa Ross: After Night,” 2011
acurator.com/blog/2011/10/lisa-ross.html

Lisa Ross has documented the ritual objects and burial sites of the Uyghurs of Western China. In her new series, ‘After Night,’ she focuses on the sparse beds found outside in this community.

“Isolated within the vast and arid desert landscape, they... suggest an aesthetic intervention, when in fact they are captured as they were found.”

‘After Night,’ is showing at Asya Geisberg Gallery in NYC now through December 17th, with an artist talk at 1 pm on November 12th.

hyperallergenicGuest of a Guest, “This Week on New York's Art Scene,” 2011
guestofaguest.com/art/everything-you-need-to-know-this-week-on-new-yorks-art-scene-6&slide=10

ARTMOSTFIERCE BlogARTMOSTFIERCE Blog
Ruben Natal San-Miguel, 2011
artmostfierce.blogspot.com/2011/10/lisa-ross-asya-geisberg-gallery-1027.html

This is the very first Asya Geisberg Gallery Photography Solo Show as part of the gallery program and might say, it is off to a very good start. Go and see it!

Asya Geisberg Gallery is pleased to present ‘After Night,’ an exhibition of photographs by New York based artist Lisa Ross.

Uprise Art Uprise Art, “Around the City,” 2011
upriseart.tumblr.com/post/11893693408/around-the-city-10-25-10-31

The New YorkerThe New Yorker
Vince Aletti, 2011
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Neue Zürcher ZeitungNeue Zürcher Zeitung, Zurich, Germany, 2010
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NYTimesThe New York Times
Roberta Smith, 2009

LISA ROSS: ‘UNREVEALED,’ through June 13. That installation art of an extraordinary sort is as old as humankind receives further buttressing from large color photographs documenting holy sites in the Xinjiang Uyghur region in northwest China. In desert terrain, indigenous Muslims mark the graves of their dead with tangles of tall sticks and flags. Modest graves can be just a few sticks and a flag or two. Religious leaders, who are often viewed as saints, merit relatively large, shrine-like masses that are as high as 60 feet. Either way, the structures’ spirituality is self-evident. A video whose only sound is the flags flapping in the wind further explains their power. Daneyal Mahmood Gallery, 511 West 25th Street, (212) 675-2966, daneyalmahmood.com. (Smith)

NYTimesThe New York Times
Holland Cotter, 2009

LISA ROSS: ‘UNREVEALED,’ through June 13. The photographs in this beautiful show are of graves and shrines that Ms. Ross found in the wind-pummeled deserts of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of Northwest China. Each memorial, made of dried branches ornamented with bits of fabric and religious talismans, and enclosed by rickety fencing, seems to be in the process of blowing away as we watch. Their fragility seems particularly evident in two video pieces, but so does their resilience. Daneyal Mahmood Gallery, 511 West 25th Street, third floor, (212) 675-2966, daneyalmahmood.com. (Cotter)

The New YorkerThe New Yorker
Vince Aletti, 2009

On visits to a remote desert region in northwest China, Ross has photographed the burial and pilgrimage sites of saints revered by the Uyghurs, one of the country’s ethnic minority groups. Some of the graves are surrounded by picket fences and look like cribs or empty garden plots; others are collections of twigs and leafless branches, some up to sixty feet high, all flying tattered prayer flags left by pilgrims hoping for the saint’s blessing or cure. The faded pink, yellow, orange, and green of these little scraps are the only colors under the pale-blue skies. Though hardly cheerful, these makeshift folk sculptures feel brave, defiant, and optimistic against all odds. (Aletti)

ObitOBIT magazine
Jeff Weinstein, 2009
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ObitOBIT magazine
Audio Podcast
Jeff Weinstein, 2009

Le FigaroLe Figaro, France, 2009
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Genis AciGenis Aci, Istanbul, Turkey, 2009
PDF format with translation

New York MagazineNew York Magazine
Emma Pearse, 2008
www.vulture.com/2008/07/artist_lisa_ross_takes.html

The New Yorker“Cosmological Embeddedness” aka “The Flying Spaghetti Monster”, 2008
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NYTimesThe New York Times
Holland Cotter, 2006
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